Rss Feed
Tweeter button
Facebook button

Bill Cunningham, the living legend of street fashion photography

Bill Cunningham and Glenda Bailey at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Spring in New York September 8, 2014. — AFP picNEW YORK, Sept 30 — In a past life, he dressed Jackie Kennedy and designed fashionable hats.

Since then, Bill Cunningham has become a living legend of street fashion photography, a discipline he is credited with creating. His passion is still his obsession: capturing the look.

With a watchful eye, a blue workman’s shirt worn over his slightly arched back and a camera slung around his neck, Cunningham — at 85 — has the manners and vocabulary of a man of his time.

The New York Times photographer calls anyone “kid,” no matter what their age. When you speak to him, he focuses on the question and listens carefully, sometimes cupping his ear.

A step ahead

Rare are the fashion personalities today who — like Cunningham — can boast of always being fashionable, or predict what will be the next craze.

In a 2010 documentary about Cunningham, Anna Wintour — the powerful editor of American Vogue — marvelled at his ability to “see something — on the street or on the runway — that completely missed all of us. And in 6 months’ time, that will be a trend!”

The discreet man, born in Boston in 1929, “doesn’t say much,” InStyle magazine editor-at-large Hal Rubinstein told AFP after a spring-summer 2015 show during New York fashion week.

“His wealth of knowledge is absolutely staggering and he is self-effacing. He knows exactly who he is, he is nobody else’s guy but his own… It’s beyond scholarly.”

While Cunningham’s decades shooting street fashion have helped him develop an encyclopedic knowledge, the years seem not to have diminished his greatest talent: the art of unearthing major, even avant-garde, trends on the street, on the catwalk or at glittering parties.

An omnipresent figure who often travels by bike, from Fifth Avenue and 57th Street to New York’s fashion shows, Cunningham also visits Paris Fashion Week — wrapping up today — to “educate the eye.”

The intense media scrutiny on Cunningham frustrates him greatly.

In an interview, he told AFP that it “brings too much attention” to his work, and destroys it, in some ways.

An oddity in a world revolving around ego, flamboyance and individuality of style, a world in which starlets and bloggers vie for the limelight, Cunningham only aspires to one thing — being “invisible.”

“I let the street talk to me, and that’s how you get it,” he says.

Cunningham modestly claims he is “not a good photographer.”

But his work captures pure fashion moments — the elegance of a woman jumping over a puddle of water, or a dandy sporting a hat as he crosses the street.

Legacy of fashion blogging

Cunningham describes his approach in simple terms: “Not to have an idea first, but to go out and let the street speak to you.”

He launched his career as a milliner for New York high society.

In 1963, he was working at Chez Ninon, a small couture house, when regular customer Jackie Kennedy had a red Christian Dior suit flown to him before the funeral of her assassinated husband.

“There wasn’t time to get the fabric and to make a new suit, so overnight we dyed it in black,” Cunningham recalled during a conference in New York earlier this month.

His first shots of unknown women and celebrities, including actress Greta Garbo in 1978, helped him land a regular column in The New York Times, “On The Street,” where the latest trends are featured each week.

Over the years, men in skirts, leopard print, blouses for both day and night and a kaleidoscope of colours have been showcased.

“I would absolutely consider Bill Cunningham to be the founder of street style photography,” said Brad Paris, who teaches photography at the prestigious Fashion Institute of Technology in New York.

“Other photographers may have been covering street style before Cunningham, but he really made it his own with his consistent vision.”

And his work has given rise to the fashion blogger.

“Photographers like Scott Schuman (of The Sartorialist blog) were directly influenced by Cunningham’s spreads in The New York Times,” Paris added.

“Cunningham’s column led, eventually, to the idea that anyone with a camera, a WordPress account and a few ideas about fashion can influence the fashion world.

“Cunningham showed the possibilities of street style and created the environment in which it can be taken very seriously.” — AFP

Article source: http://www.themalaymailonline.com/features/article/bill-cunningham-the-living-legend-of-street-fashion-photography

Fashion retailers see sales slow as Indian summer hits High Street

Rupert Steiner for the Daily Mail

View
comments

Shares in Next fell by nearly 4 per cent, sparking fear across the High Street after the warm September weather hit sales growth at its fashion stores.

The blow to Britain’s second largest clothing chain, which has seen some of the strongest growth in the sector, sent shares in rivals down in sympathy.

Marks Spencer was down 2.6 per cent and Debenhams lost 2.59 per cent.
Analysts were concerned that if the strongest industry player had sounded the alert, it could mean even more pain for the weaker operators.

Unseasonal warmth: Sales at high street retailers were hit

Unseasonal warmth: Sales at high street retailers were hit

HM last week gave a similar warning about the Indian summer and John Lewis has said shoppers were delaying purchases of winter coats, hats and boots amid unusually mellow autumn weather.

However in a sign of confidence MS said it had no plans to bring its trading update forward which it would be required to do if there was a material change in its figures.

Britain’s largest clothing retailer had brought out a range of winter coats that won plaudits in the fashion pages, including a range designed by 60s model Twiggy.

In a cautious statement Next warned that if the warm weather continues it would have to bring down its profit forecasts.
This would only become apparent over the next four weeks.
Finance director David Keens said: ‘Cooler weather in August resulted in several very strong weeks.

‘However, warmer weather in the more important month of September has had the reverse effect.

‘The overall effect is that quarter three sales to date are up 6 per cent, which is lower than our previous forecast of 10 per cent.’

The profit forecast for the full year remains within its previous guidance given at the end of July.
If the weather changes over the next few days and a cold snap drives shoppers into stores to buy warm coats and gloves then Next believes it will be able to recapture the lost sales.

However, it said that if the unseasonal warmth carries on for another month then many winter sales will be lost for good.

Keens said: ‘If this unusually warm weather continues for the duration of October then we are likely to lower our full year profit guidance range of £775million to £815million.’

Next has been a stock market star outperforming rivals for a decade due to its strong online and catalogue business. It has also grown abroad and moved into new areas such as bedding, curtains and cushions.

The group has raised its profit guidance twice in three months but has been badly affected, along with the other retailers, by the driest September since 1910.

Alistair Davies, an analyst at broker Investec, said: ‘Sentiment is likely to be hit across the clothing sector with the initially strong sales growth seen in August slowing through September, as reflected in recent John Lewis sales data.’

Shares in Next, which are up 36 per cent over the past 12 month, were down 260p to 6605p.
Independent analyst Nick Bubb said: ‘Next are probably being unnecessarily cautious, ahead of investor meetings this week, but the market is unlikely to take any chances and the shares will be unnerved, along with High Street fashion rivals like MS and Debenhams.’

Last month Next said it believed it has benefited from a trend among mature customers to wear the same fashion as younger generations.
It said those aged about 60 are buying the same items of those aged 40 as they don’t see age preventing them from following fashion trends.

It has also been reported that MS’s crucial autumn winter collection for women has lost some of its market share to Next.
Kantar Worldpanel research for the 12 weeks to 31 August showed MS womenswear lost 0.5 percentage points.


Comments (0)

Share what you think

No comments have so far been submitted. Why not be the first to send us your thoughts,
or debate this issue live on our message boards.

Article source: http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/news/article-2775667/Fashion-retailers-sales-slowdown-Indian-summer-hits-High-Street.html

South Bombay’s Fashion Street to get a makeover

Despite being christened Fashion Street, this popular stretch in south Mumbai’s Fort area is an eyesore with haphazardly placed hawkers, parked water tankers, municipal chowkies and other illegal structures.

But in the next three months, the BMC will be giving this stretch on Mahatma Gandhi Marg a major facelift. The civic body has a beautification plan in mind for the stretch between the Metro cinema and Bombay Gymkhana road to ensure better pedestrian facilities and preservation of the grade I listed open spaces — the Azad maidan and Cross maidan on either side of the road.

The BMC will also restore the heritage ‘Fitzgerald Lamp and Fountain ensemble’ — which was initially located at Metro junction, but has been lying at the Dr Bhau Daji Lad museum in Byculla for several years — to its original location.

The plan has already got the green signal from municipal commissioner Sitaram Kunte and the Mumbai Heritage Conservation Committee (MHCC) since the area is part of the listed Fort heritage precinct, said a senior civic official.

Vasant Prabhu, deputy municipal commissioner of zone I, confirmed the news, saying, “Only 38 per cent of the open spaces are currently visible from the road. The encroachments are not only obstructing the view of the maidan, but also creating a nuisance for pedestrians.”

According to civic officials, at the Cross Maidan side of Fashion Street, there are 323 hawkers placed haphazardly. “Structures of the traffic police department, BEST chowky and other unauthorised structures have occupied large portions of the footpath, blocking the view of the maidan and forcing pedestrians to walk on the road,” a senior official associated with the project said.

The official added that on the Azad Maidan side, municipal chowkies occupying large portions of the footpath was concerning. “Several private water tankers encroach on the footpath, damaging it and making it wet and filthy. The visitor parking area of the Bombay Gymkhana has also occupied a substantial portion of the footpath,” he said.

The revamp plan also comprises making the footpaths disabled-friendly. The BMC will remove the enclosed Godrej Pavilion garden on the footpath, so the entire footpath can be accessed by pedestrians.

“A decision on the Bombay Gymkhana parking area will soon be taken by the municipal commissioner. The organisation was given an extension to continue with the parking space till September,” the official said.

The BMC will also reorganise parking. The stretch between Chafekar Bandu Chowk and BEST chowky is used for parking. “This is obstructing one lane completely,” the official said, adding that the alignment of the vendor stalls on the Fashion Street will be changed and they will now be facing each other instead of being in a single file.

Article source: http://www.dnaindia.com/mumbai/report-south-bombay-s-fashion-street-to-get-a-makeover-2022445

South Mumbai’s Fashion Street to get a makeover

Despite being christened Fashion Street, this popular stretch in south Mumbai’s Fort area is an eyesore with haphazardly placed hawkers, parked water tankers, municipal chowkies and other illegal structures.

But in the next three months, the BMC will be giving this stretch on Mahatma Gandhi Marg a major facelift. The civic body has a beautification plan in mind for the stretch between the Metro cinema and Bombay Gymkhana road to ensure better pedestrian facilities and preservation of the grade I listed open spaces — the Azad maidan and Cross maidan on either side of the road.

The BMC will also restore the heritage ‘Fitzgerald Lamp and Fountain ensemble’ — which was initially located at Metro junction, but has been lying at the Dr Bhau Daji Lad museum in Byculla for several years — to its original location.

The plan has already got the green signal from municipal commissioner Sitaram Kunte and the Mumbai Heritage Conservation Committee (MHCC) since the area is part of the listed Fort heritage precinct, said a senior civic official.

Vasant Prabhu, deputy municipal commissioner of zone I, confirmed the news, saying, “Only 38 per cent of the open spaces are currently visible from the road. The encroachments are not only obstructing the view of the maidan, but also creating a nuisance for pedestrians.”

According to civic officials, at the Cross Maidan side of Fashion Street, there are 323 hawkers placed haphazardly. “Structures of the traffic police department, BEST chowky and other unauthorised structures have occupied large portions of the footpath, blocking the view of the maidan and forcing pedestrians to walk on the road,” a senior official associated with the project said.

The official added that on the Azad Maidan side, municipal chowkies occupying large portions of the footpath was concerning. “Several private water tankers encroach on the footpath, damaging it and making it wet and filthy. The visitor parking area of the Bombay Gymkhana has also occupied a substantial portion of the footpath,” he said.

The revamp plan also comprises making the footpaths disabled-friendly. The BMC will remove the enclosed Godrej Pavilion garden on the footpath, so the entire footpath can be accessed by pedestrians.

“A decision on the Bombay Gymkhana parking area will soon be taken by the municipal commissioner. The organisation was given an extension to continue with the parking space till September,” the official said.

The BMC will also reorganise parking. The stretch between Chafekar Bandu Chowk and BEST chowky is used for parking. “This is obstructing one lane completely,” the official said, adding that the alignment of the vendor stalls on the Fashion Street will be changed and they will now be facing each other instead of being in a single file.

Article source: http://www.dnaindia.com/mumbai/report-south-mumbai-s-fashion-street-to-get-a-makeover-2022445

Russell Westbrook, Wall Street Journal fashion all-star

Russell Westbrook has made headlines this off-season with the release of his XO Barneys New York fashion line.  With Westbrook’s hard work and notoriety comes recognition, and Westbrook highlighted it on his FaceBook page.

From the WSJ:

Westbrook XO represents a new kind of season opener for Mr. Westbrook, who begins his seventh NBA campaign on Oct. 29. At 25, Mr. Westbrook is one of the most thrilling players in the game, an explosive blast of above-the-rim energy and playmaking.

But this is not a basketball story.

This is about Russell Westbrook, style vanguard. You may know that pro basketball is in the middle a style renaissance. Players have been befriending designers and cramming their long legs into the front row at fashion week. There’s LeBron James at Michael Bastian. Dwyane Wade at Richard Chai. Tyson Chandler at Alexander Wang. Amar’e Stoudemire at En Noir. The concrete corridors at basketball arenas have become new runways, where fashion-conscious players try to outdo each other before they even step on the hardwood floor.

Westbrook’s climb in the fashion industry underlies his work ethic. His unique style aside, I think we will also all be very excited when he dons his customary orange and blue once again.

Article source: http://www.welcometoloudcity.com/2014/9/28/6856735/russell-westbrook-wall-street-journal-fashion-all-star

Setting the trends: shadowing a fashion buyer at Paris Fashion Week

In a showroom set back from a seedy street in the Marais neighbourhood, the hidden Paris Fashion Week is taking place.

No, this isn’t some hip underground show by an emerging designer. There are no street-style mavens, hysterical bloggers or hard-nosed photographers encircling the entrance. Instead, rails of brightly coloured clothing line the white-painted wall, while in the centre, long tables are weighed down with laptops, folders and paperwork, pored over by studious women.

This is the real fashion week, away from the media circus. While the celebrities pose in the front rows, the nitty-gritty work of taking clothes from sample to shop is pursued by designers, boutique owners, sales people and the all-important fashion buyers.

Flicking swiftly through the rails at Stella Jean (the Vogue Italia editor Franca Sozzani’s current favourite) is Farah Mounzer, the buying manager at The Dubai Mall boutique Symphony. She’s here with Salama Alabbar, the owner and driving force behind the store’s success, to pick out the pieces that will be stocked in Dubai in spring/summer 2015. This is one of many appointments around Paris this week, with brands ranging from the famous (such as Temperley London) to the barely launched.

There are no catwalk shows for these two – but they don’t mind: with six or seven appointments a day, this is far more efficient.

“You see the fabrics and the fit up-close, there are more brands – there’s so much more in the showroom than you see in a fashion show,” says Alabbar.

We’ve just walked here at a frenetic pace from the previous appointment in another part of Paris, because taking a taxi in the city’s traffic is simply too slow when you have this many brands to see and when each appointment could take anywhere from 45 minutes to four hours.

Earlier, Mounzer and Alabbar spent several hours at the Paper Mache Tiger showroom – which hosts two floors of brands that display their wares for international buyers – hitting appointments that had been planned weeks earlier with military precision.

These are just the sort of brands Symphony is made for: well-known enough to have earned insiders’ respect but obscure enough to please those shoppers who search beyond the behemoths of fashion. I join the pair as they sit down with two brands, the Swedish company Rodebjer and the New York-based Araks.

This isn’t just about finding clothes they like, says Alabbar. It’s also about practicality. “We’re thinking of what we’ve sold before, what works, what doesn’t work, what works for certain sizes or certain occasions – is it for travel, for Ramadan, for Friday nights? We might see a coat we like, but it’s too thick and they won’t wear it in Dubai.”

Add to that the possibility of customising pieces to add sleeves, change the colours or lengthen the hemlines, together with the complexity of allocating budget to the different “drops” (the two seasonal deliveries that most brands make – for spring, the collections arrive in January and in March) – and you can see why Mounzer needs to be, as she says, “very good with ­numbers”.

This process is brutal to watch. Anyone who thinks being a fashion buyer is like going on a shopping spree with someone else’s credit card should think of the insouciantly stylish Mounzer, who’s deliberately inscrutable though always polite, shaking her head at piece after piece by Rodebjer. She’s no gushing fashionista.

“I’m very black-and-white, very organised, very on time,” she says. “I don’t like to be delayed. I have my deadlines and I know the brands have their deadlines, so I get back to them promptly, I don’t go to shows; I just have dinner and that’s it. Back home, when I’m resting, I’ll have my personal opinion about what’s pretty, but when I’m buying I only think of the customer. This is one of the main reasons I don’t do shows – I don’t like to be emotionally attached to the collection. I just go as if I’m buying books and pens.”

There’s certainly no time for niceties, as across the room the designer and sales manager at Araks are waiting for their turn to impress the Symphony girls. Yet, over the course of the hour, a selection of beautiful Rodebjer dresses, trousers, jackets and tops accumulates on the rail.

Two models take it in turns to show off items picked by the sales manager, Holly McNally, and by Mounzer and Alabbar, and they look so very different off the hanger. Some win, some lose – a moment of inspiration sees McNally sling a long, graphic cardigan over a silken pyjama set and it’s an instant hit – but many of the pieces that one would think were almost made for Dubai, such as long silky shirts and fluid dresses, don’t make the cut.

“We try not to be too commercial,” says Alabbar. “A lot of the time, salespeople will recommend a piece saying: ‘This is commercial.’ But we try to avoid the obvious pieces.”

Afterwards, the rail is assessed, items rearranged, added and removed to create the perfect mix, before the serious work begins: the spreadsheets that will balance the budget on Mounzer’s computer and the order lists on McNally’s. By the time you see this collection in the boutique, in six months’ time, it will include a multitude of other designers. Then the pressure’s really on, as the brand will have to impress Dubai’s fashionistas as much as it impressed the Symphony girls.

artslife@thenational.ae

Article source: http://www.thenational.ae/arts-lifestyle/fashion/setting-the-trends-shadowing-a-fashion-buyer-at-paris-fashion-week

100+ Inspiring Street Style Snaps From Vancouver Fashion Week SS15

“The best fashion show is definitely on the street. Always has been, and always will be.” – Bill Cunningham

Each season, the city’s fashion enthusiasts gather to watch the new collections come down the runway. Just as importantly though, it’s the show-goers equally directional street style that inspire us for seasons to come. In fact, Vancouver Fashion Week SS15 was a sartorial playground for Vancouver’s fashion pack.

With Fashion Week taking place only twice a year and this season being the biggest yet, the excitement outside the tents at the Opening Gala was palpable. But in a city that isn’t known for fashion first, there were a few key differences that set the street style elite apart: their week’s worth of enviably genius ensembles planned out well ahead and how they played with these outfits to make them all their own.

While ‘fashion week street style’ can oftentimes take on a whole new meaning, it was a combination of these moments and the candid ones that truly captured the spirit of the week-long event. Even the most stylishly-inclined VFW staples – Sue and Liam Randhawa, Chris Weber, Shaughnessy Keely, Jessica Luxe, and Alanna Durkovich – managed to up the ante on their street style from seasons past and rep their personal brands to the fullest. A combination of new and old faces made for an exciting scene outside the shows at fashion week this season.

Jump From Paper 2D bags dominated many shoulders, Daniel Wellington watches wrested on many wrists, and Optical Boutique frames were spotted on the city’s most fashionable throughout the week. Personal style ran the gamut from neon brights and extravagant prints to head to toe minimal black and white.

So, scroll down for 100+ street style snaps of the most imaginative looks we spotted outside the shows at Vancouver Fashion Week, and those that will inspire your outfit planning for months to come!

Day 1-4: Photos by StreetScout.Me
Day 5-7: Photos by Marshall Heritage

Day 1

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-6

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-8

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-2

VFW 2015-1-60

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-15

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-16

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-17

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-19

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-20

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-22

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-27

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-28

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-29

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-31

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-32

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-35

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-36

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-37

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-38

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-39

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-40

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-41

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-42

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-44

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-45

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-48

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-54

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-56

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-60

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-61

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-63

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-69

VFW 2015-1-59

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-70

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-59

Day 2

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-72

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-77

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-81

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-82

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-85

VFW 2015-1-58

VFW 2015-1-61

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-88

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-91

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-92

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-97

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-98

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-99

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-100

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-101

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-102

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-106

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-105

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-107

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-109

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-113

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-112

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-115

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1-116

Vancouver Fashion Week 2015-1

Day 3

VFW 2015-1-4

VFW 2015-1-6

VFW 2015-1-8

VFW 2015-1-25

VFW 2015-1-62

VFW 2015-1-9

VFW 2015-1-11

VFW 2015-1-13

VFW 2015-1-14

VFW 2015-1-15

VFW 2015-1-16

VFW 2015-1-17

VFW 2015-1-19

VFW 2015-1-21

VFW 2015-1-22

VFW 2015-1-23

VFW 2015-1-26

VFW 2015-1-31

VFW 2015-1-32

VFW 2015-1-34

VFW 2015-1-35

VFW 2015-1-36

VFW 2015-1-38

VFW 2015-1-39

VFW 2015-1-40

VFW 2015-1-24

VFW 2015-1-64

Day 4

VFW 2015-1-42

VFW 2015-1-43

VFW 2015-1-44

VFW 2015-1-46

VFW 2015-1-47

VFW 2015-1-48

VFW 2015-1-50

VFW 2015-1-51

VFW 2015-1-52

VFW 2015-1-53

VFW 2015-1-54

VFW 2015-1-55

VFW 2015-1-58

VFW 2015-1-59

VFW 2015-1-2

VFW 2015-1-3

VFW 2015-1-5

VFW 2015-1-6

VFW 2015-1-7

VFW 2015-1-9

VFW 2015-1-10

VFW 2015-1-13

VFW 2015-1-15

VFW 2015-1-16

VFW 2015-1-17

VFW 2015-1-65

VFW 2015-1-63

Day 5

VFW 2015-1-25

VFW 2015-1-19

VFW 2015-1-20

VFW 2015-1-29

VFW 2015-1-18

VFW 2015-1-30

VFW 2015-1-27

VFW 2015-1-32

VFW 2015-1-23

VFW 2015-1-35

VFW 2015-1-36

VFW 2015-1-21

VFW 2015-1-66

Day 6

VFW 2015-1-38

VFW 2015-1-39

VFW 2015-1-40

VFW 2015-1-41

VFW 2015-1-42

VFW 2015-1-43

VFW 2015-1-44

VFW 2015-1-45

VFW 2015-1-46

VFW 2015-1-47

VFW 2015-1-48

VFW 2015-1-49

Day 7

VFW 2015-1-50

VFW 2015-1-51

VFW 2015-1-52

VFW 2015-1-53

VFW 2015-1-54

VFW 2015-1-55

VFW 2015-1-56

VFW 2015-1-57

See more street style photos from Vancouver Fashion Week on StreetScout.Me

Article source: http://www.vancitybuzz.com/2014/09/inspiring-street-style-snaps-vancouver-fashion-week-ss15/

The Best Of Paris Fashion Week Street Style

Of all the fashion weeks around the world, it’s pretty safe to say that Paris Fashion Week is the crème de la crème.

Not only do all the major designers — like Karl Lagerfeld, Olivier Rousteing and Alber Elbaz — show in the City of Light but the street style is to die for. People pull out all the stops. Between the couture-like proportions, Chanel bags and monochromatic outfits, there is enough fashion inspiration to last until spring.

Check out the most drool-worthy street style images below and tell us you aren’t planning your next trip to Paris.

  • Getty Images/Timur Emek

  • Getty Images/ Vanni Bassetti

  • Getty Images/Timur Emek

  • Getty Images/ Vanni Bassetti

  • Getty Images/ Vanni Bassetti

  • Getty Images/Timur Emek

  • Getty Images/ Vanni Bassetti

  • Getty Images/ Vanni Bassetti

  • Getty Images/ Vanni Bassetti

  • Getty Images/ Vanni Bassetti

  • Getty Images/ Vanni Bassetti

  • Getty Images/ Vanni Bassetti

  • Getty Images/ Vanni Bassetti

  • Getty Images/ Vanni Bassetti

  • Getty Images/Timur Emek

  • Getty Images/Timur Emek

  • Getty Images/Timur Emek

  • Getty Images/Timur Emek

  • Getty Images/Timur Emek

  • Getty Images/Vanni Bassetti

  • Getty Images/Timur Emek

  • Getty Images/Timur Emek

  • Getty Images/Timur Emek

  • Getty Images/Timur Emek

  • Getty Images/Vanni Bassetti

  • Getty Images/Timur Emek

  • Getty Images/Timur Emek

Article source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/09/26/paris-street-style_n_5888926.html

How To Dress Like An Italian Girl — 50+ Lessons Worth Knowing

Article source: http://www.refinery29.com/2014/09/74945/milan-fashion-week-2014-street-style

10 things to know about Victoria Beckham’s new Dover Street store

1) The store was designed by Farshid Moussavi, one of the most successful female architects currently designing. Moussavi was responsible for the masterplan and infrastructure of the London Olympic Park. For a sense of her angular, modern, clean aesthetic, check out the Museum of Contemporary Art in Cleveland, Ohio. Also, she’s very glamorous and wears five-inch heels to site meetings.

2) It has a signature scent. Diptyque’s Feu de Bois candles, to be precise.

3) Meet the neighbours! It’s bang opposite Dover Street Market, and a few doors down from the Arts Club. So, handy forpicking up a spot of Saint Laurent and Christopher Kane before tea with Gwyneth.

4) There’s a Damien Hirst in the VIP personal shopping area.

Handbags at Victoria Beckhams shop.
Handbags at Victoria Beckham’s shop.

5) The American walnut cabinets are all made with wood from the same tree. Victoria described this as “really, really expensive” – and we suspect her bar for “expensive” is slightly higher than most people’s.

6) Anna Wintour has been already (She was coming in as the Guardian were leaving. We got there first. She was in a Prada coat).

7) The central feature is an imposing polished-concrete staircase. So maybe don’t wear tricky heels unless you want to risk falling over in front of VB, Anna or similar.

8) VB’s favourite feature is the dark, beetle-shell green glass wall of the changing room.

The store was designed by Farshid Moussavi.
The store was designed by Farshid Moussavi.

9) Even megastars have builder trouble. Two nights before opening, Beckham arrived for an evening visit to find the builders in finishing off a few jobs, “and getting dust all over the clothes. They hadn’t protected the clothes! Can you imagine?”

10) VB has suggested that David might be found working in the store now and then, perhaps as a doorman. Any reader who can send us a snap of David actually doing this wins a prize.

Article source: http://www.theguardian.com/fashion/fashion-blog/2014/sep/24/10-things-about-victoria-beckham-dover-street-store