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British Fashion Council to help young designers on to high street

The British Fashion Council is to encourage burgeoning fashion designers to consider the opportunities presented by the high street, rather than solely focusing on the rarefied world of the catwalk, with the launch of a new initiative on Wednesday.

Titled BFC Contemporary, the eBay-sponsored scheme will offer a handful of designers tailored programmes of advice and mentoring with a view to high-street success. Women’s ready-to-wear designers Alexis Barrell, Georgia Harding, Paper London, Zoë Jordan and sunglasses and swimwear brand Prism, have been selected for the inaugural season.

As part of the scheme, the designers will create limited edition pieces to be sold within a specialist BFC Contemporary Shop on eBay, at Somerset House at the BFC’s London Fashion Week pop-up shop in September.

The initiative was launched in response to increasing global demand for “contemporary” fashion – labels such as Acne, The Kooples, Maje and Sandro which sit at the high end of the high street but do not usually show during fashion weeks. In the UK, the market is relatively small, and contemporary designers tends not to enjoy the profile of their catwalk counterparts. Here, says the BFC’s Sophie McElligott, “we pride ourselves on young creatives showing extravagant catwalk collections, and they are brilliant, but some designers want to dress more people and to do it more quickly. This is about seeing those designers not as a niche presence but as a part of London fashion week and the British Fashion Council.”

“Often, when fashion students graduate, they are encouraged to become catwalk designers and to focus on showing at London fashion week” she continues. “We recognised that a lot of designers can’t afford to start their business by creating high-end artisinal pieces, or by putting on fashion shows, which are very expensive. There is nothing wrong with that system, but it’s not for everyone.”

Article source: http://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2014/jul/23/british-fashion-council-to-help-young-designers-on-to-high-street

Street fashion: Summertime looks in North Loop

 

 

Aubrey Todd
20, student 

What are you wearing? HM pants, shirt from Buffalo Exchange, Chinese Laundry shoes.

Describe your style: During the summer my style is more bohemian, but the winter I dress more minimal and classic in usually all black. 

Favorite North Loop spot?  I love the Bachelor Farmer.

A piece of fashion advice that you don’t follow? The rule about never mixing brown and black — they look good together. 

 

 

Chiara Rosenbaum
21, student

What are you wearing? Brandy and Melville floral dress, belt from Gap, high-top Converse, Persol sunglasses, purse from Madewell.

Describe your style: An eclectic mix of basic and unexpected.

Favorite North Loop spot? The Freehouse. Delicious food, relaxed and friendly atmosphere, and the best Bloody Mary’s I’ve ever had. 

A piece of fashion advice that you don’t follow? The stigma that horizontal stripes are unflattering. I love them!

 

 

Sanibel Chai
21, co-founder of WICK clothing, student

What are you wearing? MOTHER jeans, ALC blouse, Chanel shoes, Givenchy bag, Balenciaga bracelet.

Describe your style: Comfortable and low-key.

Favorite North Loop spot? Borough.

How has your style changed in the past couple years? Focused more on fit and tailoring than trend.

A piece of fashion advice that you don’t follow? White after Labor Day.

 

 

Raquel Malin
37, stay at home mom

What are you wearing? Coach aviator sunglasses, black shirt from Target, chambray button-down shirt from Vietnam, Zara jeans, sandals from Myer (a department store in Australia), cross-body purse from Colette.

Describe your style: I like to mix classics and sophistication with a little edge.

Favorite North Loop spot? We just moved to Minneapolis from Australia, so this is my first time in the North Loop. We enjoyed Moose and Sadie’s for a coffee!

How has your style changed in the past couple years? We lived in Sydney, Australia for three years, so my style definitely changed a little by living there and traveling.

Article source: http://www.vita.mn/crawl/268330022.html

MANGO’s High Street Fashion Now on Myntra.com

One of the world’s leading international fashion retailers MANGO, will extend its online presence on Myntra.com from August 2014. Through this association, Myntra.com has taken one step further in making international fashion accessible to shoppers in the country with the widest assortment of style from MANGO’s international collection.
 
Starting August 2014, Myntra.com will offer over 800 styles for women starting from as low as INR 700 for basics going up to INR 16,000 for limited edition collections. The women’s range would include everyday wear as well as office staples such as shirts, suits and tops along with a huge variety of dresses as part of their evening wear collection. Additionally, ‘H.E. by MANGO’, the range for men and MANGO Kids, will be available on the portal later this year. With this alliance, MANGO will leverage Myntra.com’s vast shopper base and reach across India to strengthen its presence in one of the fastest growing retail markets in the world.
 
Mango has been at the forefront of the fashion retail revolution and the brand has almost become synonymous with the term, ‘fast fashion’. Dressing up the modern, urban women for her daily needs has been MANGO’s winning formula.
 
Jaime Mur, MANGO Country Manager for India, South Korea, Japan and Sri Lanka: “It is a pleasure for MANGO to extend its footprint in India through MYNTRA.COM. We believe this long term partnership will bring both MANGO and MYNTRA to a new level in the always exciting India fashion market. Our strong ties will be beneficial not only for fashion conscious woman in India but also for men and kids soon since we are planning to bring our other lines H.E. by Mango and MANGO KIDS during 2014.”
 
Commenting on this partnership, Ashutosh Lawania, co-founder, Myntra said, “As India’s leading e-commerce platform, it made perfect sense to add MANGO to our existing international brand portfolio which represents style, quality and high fashion. We are thrilled to partner with this global high street fashion brand which already has a loyal fan following in India.”

He further added, “With this association, fashion conscious consumers will soon be able to access the widest collection of the latest Autumn/Winter’14 styles from MANGO right at their doorstep.”
 
Earlier this year, Myntra.com partnered with famous international brands like Desigual, 883 Police, Scotch Soda, Supra, Jansport etc to offer exclusive collections to Myntra shoppers across the country. Today, Myntra also offers collections from world renowned designers like Anita Dongre, Rakesh Pratap Singh, Manish Arora and exclusive designer wear from Stylista.
 
MANGO is Spain’s second largest exporter of women’s fashion. Its concept is based on an alliance between a quality product, in accordance with the latest fashion trends, and an affordable price. The brand image is reinforced by its company-owned stores, which represent a calling card for the brand and create a dynamic image in accordance with the personality of its customers.
 
MANGO currently has a total of 2,700 stores in 107 countries worldwide.

About Myntra.com:

Myntra.com is among the leading e-commerce platforms in India for fashion and lifestyle products. Myntra has partnered with over 650 leading fashion and lifestyle brands in the country such as Nike, Adidas, Puma, Lee, Levis, Wrangler, Arrow, Jealous 21, Diesel, CAT, Timberland, US Polo, FabIndia, Biba and many more to offer a wide range in latest branded fashion and lifestyle wear. The platform receives over 50 million visits every month and services over 9,000 pin codes across the country. With the largest in-season product catalogue, 100% authentic products, Cash On Delivery and 30-day Exchange/Return policy, Myntra.com is today the preferred shopping destination in India.

Article source: http://businesswireindia.com/news/news-details/mangos-high-street-fashion-now-myntracom/40060

High street giant Zara launches new tagging technology to make fashion even …

Spanish high street store Zara has made the first step to resolving this with a new technology that allows it to restock sizes and styles faster.

Unveiled at the Annual General Meeting of Inditex (Zara’s parent company) earlier this week, the Radio Frequency Identification Technology allows the brand to track every garment, from factory to final sale.

What this means for the store is a much more reactive logistical process whereby sold out styles or popular sizes will be replenished with speed.

So if you find yourself hankering after Zara’s sleeveless tailored white waistcoat but can’t seem to get your hands on it, the new RFID technology will make sure it soon reappears.

Likewise if the Duchess of Cambridge sports another Zara number prompting instant sell out, it will become far easier for Kate Middleton fans wanting to emulate her style when the item soon restocks.

It’s also good news if you’re trying to track down a size because the new technology means it’s easy to locate the whereabouts of other items.

The RFID technology is already in widespread use across other industries from animal identification tags to passports and transport.

If all that has you feeling the urge to take a trip to your nearest Zara, here is our pick of the best new season styles available in store now.

Article source: http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/fashion/news/high-street-giant-zara-launches-new-tagging-technology-to-make-fashion-even-faster-9614955.html

The biggest high street fashion brand fails

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Article source: http://www.handbag.com/shopping-bag/feature/a581901/the-biggest-high-street-fashion-brand-fails.html

Upcoming St. Louis Fashion Events

What Is Your Wonderland? • Fashion and live art show will feature original designs and reconstructed vintage looks, jewelry, accessories, and artwork inspired by the 2010 film “Alice in Wonderland” from 6:30 to 9 p.m., Friday (July 18) at The Art Institute of St. Louis, 1520 South 5th Street, St. Charles. $10-$20, whatisyourwonderland.eventbrite.com

Garbage Bag Gala 2014 • The Salvation Army’s third annual Garbage Bag Gala and Fashion Show injects a novel twist on haute couture as prominent and emerging designers make the unimaginable fashionable. This fashion-packed competition raises valuable dollars for The Salvation Army. 7 p.m., July 25 at Moulin, 2017 Chouteau Avenue. $25. stlsalvationarmy.org/garbagebaggala

“Thrive” Fashion Production • Eight fashion designers and two visual artists hailing from places near as Chicago and far as LA will present creations centered on the concept of Thrive. 7 p.m., July 27 at Moulin, 2017 Chouteau Avenue. $25-$35. 314-241-4949

Pins and Needles STL • At Pins and Needles, competing designers showcase collections to fashion-goers and judged by a panel of experts to win the grand prize package valued at over $15,000 and a spot in St. Louis Fashion Week. 7 p.m. Aug. 2 at The Gallery 400, 400 Washington Avenue. $0-$15. 314-484-9352

The Wedding Show • The largest wedding planning event in St. Louis. It features more than 80,000 square feet of exhibits, a main stage fashion show, transportation displays, live music, prize vault, unique wedding products, free samples and more. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 3 at America’s Center, 701 Convention Plaza. $8. 636-530-7989

Savage Botanicals Fashion Show • The Missouri Botanical Garden will host a botanical fashion show, “Savage Botanicals.” Created by members of the American Institute of Floral Designers, the show features couture fashions made with plant materials. Joyce Mason-Monhiem will present designs inspired by Lee Alexander McQueen. 5:30 p.m. Aug. 8 at the garden’s visitors center, 4344 Shaw Boulevard. $40 ($25 for garden members). 314-577-5100 or mobot.org

For more events or to enter yours, go to events.stltoday.com.

Article source: http://www.stltoday.com/lifestyles/fashion-and-style/debra-bass/upcoming-st-louis-fashion-events/article_0ce30362-d031-5159-9e99-c5bdc86a3e1b.html

Street fashion inspires new Vicunha denim line


Inspired by street fashion and both cool and fresh style, VICUNHA TEXTIL launched a new line based in two main concepts: freedom and attitude! They were translated into high-performance fabrics with maximum versatility, elasticity and urban look.

Inspired by the lifestyle of large cities and the practice of urban sports like parcours, skateboarding and street dance, a video created by VICUNHA shows the indigos and twills with the technological Athletic concept.

“Bungee”, “Bungee Black” and “Spinning” are the three articles on the twills line, Athletic Color. They all have high elasticity ranging from 40% to 65% with really soft touch. “Spinning” is the only of the three that comes in a nice range of colors despite the ready to dye version.

Black, Claret and Concrete tones are a few of the highlights to be featured for Winter 2015. The Athletic Denim line, great success of the last collection VICUNHA, Summer 15, is now enriched by two new fabrics, “Squash” and “Step”.

Article source: http://www.fibre2fashion.com/news/fashion-news/newsdetails.aspx?news_id=165863

6 of the biggest high street fashion brand fails

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Article source: http://www.handbag.com/shopping-bag/feature/a581901/6-of-the-biggest-high-street-fashion-brand-fails.html

Bole – the Heartbeat of Addis Street Fashion

Cropped pants, ripped clothing, button-up shirts, big boots, strange hairstyle, dreadlocks, and Afros are some of the styles that are part of the new overwhelming street fashion scene of Addis.

The presence of a multi-billion dollar fashion industry is non-existent in Addis; it’s the streets of the city that give a platform to what fashion is here. Apart from the mainstream cultures of of short hair, jeans, suits and dresses, Addis streets give an alternative style. Like many other cities in the world, the urban community with a collective identity is influenced by the youth subculture. This subculture goes further than just outfits; it is a lifestyle that intersects with music, aesthetics, and more in order to use it as a form of expression. The colorful sight is very interesting. So many cultures intersect and fuse at the same time. One cannot escape the scene of the heartbeat of Addis’ fashion bole street fashion. The hippies, rockers (with rings, many piercings,) hipsters (glasses, jeans, beanies, sneakers, ties, suspenders), gothic fashion (black clothing, heavy coats, black makeup), preppy (argyle sweaters, chinos, madras, Nantucket red pants, boat shoes), colorful apparel, with many piercings are fused in the contrasting city of Addis.

Whether they are trying to make a statement with the outfits, accessories and hairstyles or not, the Bole neighborhood seems to be the area where fashion in mainstream and alternative forms exists. “What do I wear today?” might be the phrase or a serious question for some, where outfits are more than outfits but rather a form of expression to pass a massage to others. Do outfits express the lifestyle one wants to pass or is clothing just imitations of the media and the sub-culture from the different social media. The street fashionistas of Addis Ababa have their own things to say regarding that. Walking around Bole, many pedestrians are very comfortable in talking about their fashion, music and the value of what their outfit is about. With a jean jacket, black tights with safety pins, and a ponytail, Selam who is walking around Kenenisa Hotel was confused about why she was being asked about her outfits. For her, clothes are to be worn, nothing else, and when she buys them there is no overthinking, she just buys what she things looks good on her. Beauty seems to matter more than anything and she follows that trend.

Roaming around Bole, two girls, Kalkidan Zegeye and Marin Sirak, with the 90s style African American throwbacks are comfortably walking the streets. With short brown military boots, an old school white sweater, ripped jeans, green eyeliner, pink lipstick and colored hair, outfits are an expression of one’s self for Kalkidan.. The question was: “What does your outfit say?” She replied “free, cool and funny.” She does not just pick clothes; she looks for the different fashion magazines and Facebook pages to look for different outfits. That is why Kalkidan says “fashion is a way of life to express what you want to say.”

Her friend Marin Sirak was dressed in high waist leggings, a red old school sweater with writing on it, black timberland shoes, four rings, ear piercings and a watch. Their friendship also seems to tune in to their interests, music and outfits, which is reminiscent of 90′s hip-hop culture and the music they listen to also revolves around that. For her, the way she was attired also makes a statement, “not too classy, enjoying freedom, looking comfortable, decent.” With the particular tastes they have, they say it is difficult to get all the clothes and accessories they want since they want unique things, so relatives from America and their hostess friends bring it to them. Committing to their hip-hop influence is not easy, sometimes it is taken as defiance, especially in the workplace. Marin is one of those who has to confront her colleagues for wearing what she chooses. They claim they are the cool crows while giving clothes an aesthetic form. But the message they give off might not be decoded right and they are not scared of that. For them and for those who believe fashion is a statement there seems to be an urban community that understands the fashion in different aspects and also the cultural values it is passing.

Observing Addis with all its colorful hipsters, punks, preppies, and Rasta elements, Tsige Tafesse, New York-based artist is amused. Tsige usually puts static narratives to her attire beginning with Doc Martin boots and ending with as many colors and patterns that she can put together before they clash. But never without the Ethiopian neck crosses. Fashion, as she describes it, is “self expression the way one wants to present themselves to the world. It can also mean a form of identity creation, identity affirmation,” which makes her excited to see people fully committed and with such an enthusiastic approach to fashion. The streets give a platform for any kind of outfit, one wants to wear and she talks about her first introduction to the street fashion “at first what really struck me about Addis fashion is the infusion of African iconography, Ethiopian and also black American aesthetics and how they are all infused together.”

With the rise of the urban youth collective identity, everywhere in the world is also a depreciation of an interest for those multi-million dollar companies that spend a lot of money with trending and outfits based on the different seasons. These outfits for Tsige are a specific assigned aesthetics.

“It feels like Addis fashion is seasonless. People are creating with what they have and whatever they want.”

Related to most of the aesthetics is music and the music element is passing collectively.

Within these she also witnessed a feeling of the sameness everywhere, which is creating an urban collective identity, which is youth-culture based.

“The similarity is everywhere where we have connected where we have never been before. It is not like dictating from one point but rather the influence is from everywhere, ” comments Tsige. The mainstream popular companies also started to do the cultural appropriation by putting in an “African element” and trying to emulate the youth culture.

With technology and digitization around the globe, the self-expression and movement of this time seems to be influenced by each other.

Within these there are also many who don’t see fashion or outfits as a lifestyle but rather to make a political statement such as dreadlocks being associated with the history of slavery and nature, where defying the concept of Euro-centric thinking of straightening hair. For Tsige fashion is a claiming of identities with a statement, clothing which she says “I want them to express all my identities at once; Ethiopian-American, pan-Africanist, feminist, art maker, occasionally anarchist and other identities. With her attires she aligns with her community, which is used as a platform, which might lead to spark conversations which makes her say “we dress for our tribe.” Dressing for the tribe seems to be a concept also for Kalkidan and Marin who claim they are part of the cool crowd. Walking in Bole, there were the two preppy sisters Mahlet Migora and Mihret Migora who came from Geneva for vacation. Fashion being nostalgic and about the past for Mahlet, she was wearing her father’s button up big shirt tied around her waist and leggings. She says: “fashion is being yourself and also comfortable.”

The two sisters talk at the same time while with some questions being indifferent about it. They share the same interests, usually going to stores with vintage outlets.

Mihret, who is now a university student and who was a model for Annabel and Cosmopolitian for almost three years, is wearing Timberland shoes, open shirt on the chest, leggings and a glittering bag says: “It is about being easy and open minded.”

Addis is full of men with styles just as outlandish and styles that differ just as much as the women’s. Dawit, with nerdy glasses, cropped jeans and a very pleasant smile, says “freestyle” is what his style is about. With this style he takes his inspiration from music, dancehall and reggae, which are actually manifested in the outfit he is wearing.

Article source: http://allafrica.com/stories/201407140384.html

Korean Coed Street Fashion at Ewha Woman’s University!

This is the second installment in a series introducing key fashion neighborhoods in Seoul, Korea, which has become quite a fashion hub and a hotbed of street fashion, although you may not have heard  this yet. It’s my goal to familiarize Western readers  with the fact that parts of Seoul are now hotter than Harajuku in terms of fashion creativity and dynamicism, even if it lacks the Cosplay flash. But that’s what makes the street fashion in Seoul all the more real and interesting. These are the fashions of everyday Koreans and those who follow them sartorially, and these are streets worth watching.
After one of the student interns bravely grab her and combine her to pose, turns out she was with one of the many Chinese tourists who are legion at the Ewha front gate, which is apparently a major tourist destination for the Chinese who come to Korea, an

Ewha Woman’s University is one of the oldest universities in Seoul, founded as many were by American Protestant missionaries, and considered to be one of the top universities a woman can attend in general, right behind what Koreans call the “SKY” universities, which is short for Seoul National, Korea, and Yonsei Universities. Doesn’t fit into the acronym, but it’s up there bumping shoulders of those universities in terms of quality and reputation. Now, despite being a women’s University, one has to remember that Korea is still defined by the gender norms of America in the 1960s. Boys are boys and girls are girls, especially at a women’s University, with the social norm being to wear heels and a dress, full-on makeup, and have every hair on the head in perfect place. Ewha Woman’s University is infamous for what’s students only half-jokingly called the “9 a.m. morning fashion show” in which the front gate is stormed by freshly dressed and fashionable women rushing to their first class of the day amidst a cacophony of click-clacking high heels. This is not to say that every woman in Korean college dresses this way, but I think it would be safe for the non-initiated to completely eliminate any idea of the American-style undergraduate rolling out of bed and into class in one’s pajamas and slippers or without at least a long session spent in front of the makeup mirror.

I started out shooting a bit of Ewha Women’s University front gate for this story, with three student interns in tow, when a lady with the best Korean-style sports jersey dress ever pops into view. This is one of the most popular styles on the Korean streets this summer and it was apropos that she appeared on the scene just as we arrived, so I had to snap a surreptitious shot of her outfit just in case she decided not to pose for camera willingly.

Was out shooting a bit of Ewha Women's University front gate for a story on that neighborhood I'm planning for the Huff Post, with 3 student interns in tow, and a lady with the best Korean-style sports jersey dress ever pops into view.

After one of the student interns bravely grabbed her and got her to pose, it turned out she wasone of the many Chinese tourists who are legion at the Ewha front gate these days, which is apparently a major tourist destination for the Chinese who come to Korea, which made sense since we spotted entire tour groups led by guides with flags right in the area we started shooting.  This young lady turned out to be a confident  street fashion model possessed of a Mona Lisa smile. Turns out she’s an exchange student studying somewhere and Seoul and bought her sports jersey dress in Korea.

She turned out to be a confident model with a Mona Lisa smile. Turns out she's an exchange student studying somewhere and Seoul and bought her sports jersey dress in Korea.

You can get a sense of how the mesh works and its transparency with a closer picture using the wide-angle lens, which is more my style, anyway.

You can get a sense of how the mesh works and it's transparency with a closer picture using the wide-angle lens, which is more my style, anyway.

Her and her companion were quite the couple and comfortable with the camera. We were actually pretty wise to arrive on campus around noon time, since we are able to find several real students to shoot in their natural environment actually going and coming from class. The Idae area (as it is known to Koreans by its Korean abbreviation of “Ewha” and University” (ewha+dae-hak-kyo=”idae”) is renowned for its young female fashion, but this is often a misleading place for street fashion photographers to shoot since is a major watering hole for women wanting to be fashionable, whether their students are not. So after school hours or on the weekends, most of the women in the area are not representative of young Korean female student fashion. We made sure to be on the spot during the prime hours for actually catching students attending the campus.

Her and her companion were quite the couple and comfortable with the camera.

We immediately spotted some girls in a coffee shop we went to have a quick meeting and noticed the “West Coast” sports jerseys and were debating whether not to approach them for picture when I noticed that they were wearing matching jerseys T-shirts and that’s cinched it. We had to get them. Find and it turned out they were also Chinese tourists who had just bought T-shirts in Dongdaemun, which they let us know through Google translate, and were eager to show us the very store where they had just seen these shirts earlier and were eagerly pointing it out as I was taking the pictures. They actually wanted to walk us over and show us the shirts on the rack. However, we didn’t have time.

We immediately spotted some girls in a coffee shop we went to have a quick meeting and noticed the West Coast sports jerseys and were debating whether not to approach them for picture when I noticed that they were wearing matching jerseys T-shirts and t

It seemed like we were mostly catching Chinese tourists, and we were hoping to get more actual students from the University. Since it was lunchtime, we decided that moving in toward the center of campus would yield more Korean students actually attending the university, who would be walking out of classes toward the surrounding area. However, given the fact that most of the Chinese tourists and exchange students we were catching seemed to be very big fans of Korean fashion and were actually better models for current trends than even the Koreans were, this turned out to be a good thing. All of the young Chinese women we caught on film were eager to tell us where they had bought their clothes — and the new Dongdaemun Design Plaza seemed to be a major stop on the fashion train for all of them.

It seems like room most eye-catching Chinese tourists, and we were hoping to get more actual students from the University. Since it was lunchtime, we decided that moving in towards the center of campus would yield more Korean students actually attending t

We came across something pretty rare these days on the Korean university: an actual demonstration! Well, actually it was more of a quasi-demonstration, a sort of information session designed to get people to sign a petition. I was actually more interested in her hair and her T-shirt then the actual content of the petition drive, and it seemed very much along the lines of something students do. Ewha fashion!

We came across something pretty rare these days on the Korean university: an actual demonstration! Well, actually it was more of a quasi-demonstration, actually a sort of information session designed to get people to sign a petition. I was actually more i

Upon asking this young lady whether or not I could use her picture for the purposes of a street fashion piece, she said that she preferred to not use the picture with her posing without the sign. However, in all honesty, I was more interested in her cool hair color and her T-shirt. But we wish her luck with her cause and in getting more money to janitorial workers in her University, which is I think one of the goals that I heard being mentioned.

Upon asking young lady whether or not I could use her picture for the purposes of a street fashion piece, she said that she preferred to not use the picture with her posing without the sign. However, in all honesty, I was more interested in her cool hair

More toward the interior of the campus, we are bumping into more everyday students doing everyday things, such as carrying their cups of iced coffee. This young lady is wearing one of the most popular skirts in Korea this summer season and we had to ask her to pose.

More towards the interior of the campus, we are bumping into more everyday students doing everyday things, such as carrying their cups of iced coffee. This young lady is wearing one of the most popular skirts in Korea this summer season and we had to ask

No matter how far we got into the campus, tourists were still legion. These two young ladies were walking through campus and more than happy to have their pictures taken by a street fashion photography crew.If anything, the many tourists both in front of and actually on campus were testament to the power of the so-called “Korean wave” in Asia. Korea, at the very least in Asia, has definitely become a place known for being modern, fashionable, and very cool.

The matter how far we got into the campus, Chinese tourists were still legion. These two young ladies were walking through campus and more than happy to have their pictures taken by a street fashion photography crew.

We were now bumping into more Korean students coming out of or going into classes, and we caught this young fashionista on the way into campus, and she was easy and relaxed in front of the camera, a natural model.

We are now bumping into more cream students coming out of or going into classes, and we caught this young fashionista on the way into campus, and she was easy and relaxed in front of the camera, a natural model.

She’s a natural model, like many Korean girls who were trained on a diet of sticker pictures, private photo booths, and cell phone cams. South Korea coined its own word for “selfie” back in around 2004. Young Korean girls our well-trained in the fine art of “selca” (SELf+CAmera) and were uploading their super selfie portraits to eoljjang (best face) sites that became popular around that time as well. The average female Korean college student has about as much de facto amateur modeling experience as the average Western amateur model who has seen the inside of a photo studio.

She's a natural.

We were lucky to meet someone do awesome. Badumbump.

Cool shot of the impromptu Ewha model of the day!

We ended our little foray into the Ewha Woman’s University with a bit more conservative, representative fare for the Koreans students these days. And her heavily-ornamented gladiator sandals are definitely the thing with the kids these days.

We ended our little foray into the Ewha Woman's University with a bit more conservative, representative fare for the Koreans students these days. And her heavily-ornamented gladiator sandals are definitely the thing with the kids these days.

That’s the way you end a street fashion photo foray!

That's the way you end a street fashion photo foray!

As soon as the day ended and I was sitting in my office, as if on cue, our “awesome” model from a few hours earlier sent me a message about her pictures and we quickly decided that it would be cool to do an impromptu studio session since I had my studio equipment sitting in a box in my office ready to go and all you would need to do is find a white wall in a hallway somewhere. Considering what we had to work with, but also the find the picture we came up with but also surprising. but also, considering the natural talent and these which our model possessed, it’s not really any surprise we got what we did. Definitely one of the best street fashion models I’ve ever bump into — and I don’t think it’s any coincidence that she is a true-blue Ewha student.

Our best model wanted to do a bit of studio after her great street shoot. She is indeed awesome.

 

P.S.  Many thanks to my Seoul Fashion Report interns Charlotte Gryson, Yubin Lee, and Junha Kim, without whom I would have had a lot of trouble shooting for this story.

Article source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/michael-hurt/korean-coed-street-fashio_b_5583907.html