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Fashion industry, retailers and the gender binary

Click photo to enlargeFILE – This Jan. 10, 2014 file photo shows Laura Jane Grace, formerly known as Tom Gabel, of the band Against Me!, in New York. Grace, 33, publicly came out as transgender in 2012. She was born Tom Gabel and performed with the Florida-based band since 1997. At 6-2, with a mostly black wardrobe worthy of a rocker, Grace recalls the days before she was “out” and on the hunt for women’s clothes. Grace said she usually shops online, shares a shoe size with her wife (a women’s 10) and picks up specialty pieces in boutiques during road trips with the band that last for weeks. (Photo by Brian Ach/Invision/AP, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — As a transgender woman who began her transition about a year ago, Kylie Jack is still figuring out her fashion style, but she wanted one thing right away: well-fitting bras.

Friends recommended Petticoat Fair in Austin, Texas, where she lives. The lingerie shop is known for one-on-one fittings, but Jack was denied access to the area where professionals work privately with customers after being asked if she was an anatomical female.

Jack, 39, a computer interaction designer, left empty-handed and angry. She took to social media to protest.

“It was unclear whether they had a consistent policy and I didn’t know what to make of it,” Jack said.

The owner later apologized.

A gender binary exists in fashion, and that’s a challenge for those who don’t conform. Masculine-presenting women are often destined for boys’ departments or bad fits, while people born male who transition or simply like to dress in femme clothes sometimes don’t know what to expect in sizing or from sales clerks.

“I was in Filene’s Basement in Chelsea, which is pretty much the gayest neighborhood in America, and I said, ‘Can I try on clothes here in the men’s department?’ and they said no. It’s not as bad as it used to be but it’s pretty persistent. There’s this radioactive line between the menswear department and the womenswear department,” said Susan Herr, founder of dapperQ, a site on masculine dressing for the LGBTQ community.

Online retailers catering to masculine presenters have proliferated as trans people enjoy a higher profile thanks to Laverne Cox of “Orange is the New Black” and other pioneers.

But mainstream fashion has done little to keep up with large-footed women, petite trans men, masculine-presenting lesbians or androgynous dressers in search of a decent, affordable suit.

At 5-foot-4 and 120 pounds, Gretchen Dukowitz is a lesbian who dresses on the boyish-androgynous side. Her style is casual and she doesn’t like shopping online. Her No. 1 go-to place is HM’s boys’ section.

“It’s always fun to see who will be there, whether it’s the moms buying for their kids or the lesbians,” she said. “But even in boys’ clothes, the fit is not right if you have any hips at all, which I kind of do. It pinches you in weird places. Even though you’re buying men’s clothing, you still have the shapes of a woman.”

Small designers are trying to fill the gap, but often at prices not everyone can afford.

In button-down shirting, for example, menswear is often oversized, tight in the chest or hips. Women’s tops may be too tight, too feminine or too short. The label Androgyny offers a signature fit with a “boob button” to minimize gaping, no darts, a slight hourglass curve at the bottom and a center box pleat in back for extra room through the chest and shoulders.

The cost? $125 and up to $150 for limited editions.

The toll is not always financial.

Laura Jane Grace, who fronts the punk band Against Me!, transitioned from male to female in dress onstage in 2012. At 6 foot 2, with a mostly black wardrobe worthy of a rocker, Grace recalls the days before she was “out” and on the hunt for women’s clothes.

“It was always kind of terrifying, going out and actually shopping for stuff,” said Grace, who lived in small-town Florida before moving to Chicago.

“I can’t remember an experience where someone either didn’t look at you like you were total scum or have some kind of comment to make,” she said, adding: “People look at me like I’m a thief. There’s that attention on you from the beginning that always makes for an uncomfortable experience. People watch me from the second I walk into a store that’s not specifically like a rock ‘n’ roll store because I’m covered in tattoos.”

Grace usually shops online, shares a women’s size 10 shoe with her wife and picks up specialty pieces in boutiques during band road trips.

 

Mary Going, a masculine-presenting lesbian who’s 5 foot 3 and 120 pounds, wanted a formal suit for her 2008 wedding. After fruitless trips to Nordstrom, Bloomingdale’s, Men’s Wearhouse, Banana Republic and Macy’s, she had one tailor-made for about $1,800.

“I’ve had cars that cost less than that,” said Going. “I loved that suit. I felt great in that suit in a way that I had never felt great in my clothes before. I felt taller. I felt like I got more respect and I don’t know if that’s because I presented more respectfully or because people really did see me differently.”

Going “wanted to offer that same feeling to other people, but without the $1,800 price tag” or the wait. So she founded Saint Harridan, which makes off-the-rack suits with sleek masculine looks for women and transmen.

This year the Oakland, Calif.-based entrepreneur took the brand on a pop-up tour so butch women, transmen and others can walk in and buy a reasonably priced suit. The tour has served 100 to 150 people daily on three-day stops in Baltimore, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, Seattle, New York, Philadelphia, Oakland and Minneapolis. It heads to Boston in August, followed by Detroit, Portland, Oregon, Provincetown, Massachusetts, Chicago and Los Angeles.

“We’ve had grown people stand in our store and cry because they have never experienced customer service like this,” Going said. “We’re telling them that they are valued and respected just the way they are.”

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Follow Leanne Italie on Twitter at http://twitter.com/litalie

Article source: http://www.berkshireeagle.com/ci_26230149/fashion-industry-retailers-and-gender-binary

Ready to hit the runway? Alabama Fashion Alliance hosts modeling workshop … – The Birmingham News

File photo from Birmingham Fashion Week 2014. (Tamika Moore/tmoore@al.com)  

HUNTSVILLE, Alabama – Aspiring models and anyone interested in the fashion industry are invited to a day-long workshop hosted by the Alabama Fashion Alliance on Aug. 9 at the NASA Educator Training Resource Center on the grounds of the U.S. Space Rocket Center.

Called “A Day In Fashion,” the event will feature a Runway Modeling Workshop conducted by model coaches Essence Nesbit and Dominique Davis. Janie Martin of Red Models Birmingham | Atlanta will be the featured panelist assessing models at the workshop. She’ll be available to answer questions about the modeling industry as well.

The Runway Modeling Workshop will be held 10 a.m.-1 p.m. with registration beginning at 9:30 a.m. Workshop leaders will focus on basic and advanced modeling techniques in an interactive setting. The workshop fee is $55 for AFA members; $65 for non-members.

The modeling workshop will be followed by a Fashion Show Event Planning Seminar by AFA founder LeJeune from 2-4 p.m. Tickets for this seminar are $25.

That evening at 6 p.m., the event concludes with a Fashion Network Mixer and Fashion Show, offering networking and vendor opportunities. The fashion show will feature students from the modeling workshop wearing fashions from participating retailers and boutiques. A dessert bar and beverages will be provided. Tickets for this event are $10.

Vendor information and tickets can be found online at www.afa.ticketleap.com. Additional information is available by emailing alabamafashionalliance@gmail.com or by calling (256) 585-4452.

The Alabama Fashion Alliance can be found online at www.alabamafashionalliance.com, on Facebook and on Twitter @fwahsv.

Article source: http://www.al.com/living/index.ssf/2014/07/ready_to_hit_the_runway_alabam.html

7 politically incorrect fashion statements

When it comes to slogans and motifs in fashion, we’ve been bombarded with “Love” and “Je t’aime” slogan sweaters for more seasons than you can remember, and hearts will never go out of style.

But finally, the counterpart to all this mushy fashion is taking over — as controversial, impolite, offensive and sometimes just plain politically incorrect slogans are in vogue.

Here are a few items you can wear, when you just don’t care what everyone else thinks.

Golden Guns

Designer Hedi Slimane came out with “guns blazing” at the Saint Laurent fall 2014 runway.

Photo: Getty Images (2)

Saint Laurent dress, price upon request. Visit ysl.com for info.

Road Kill

Forget about the classic rabbit’s foot and try this pierced bunny on for size.

14k gold-plated “The Dead Bunny Collection” necklace, $88 at onchmovement.com

Oh S - - t

Who knew that someone could make stepping in poop so funny?

Velvet “The S - - t” embroidered slipper, similar styles $325 at deltoroshoes.com

Be Blunt

No-one will accuse you of mixed messages with this bracelet.


“Let’s” bracelet, $55 at venessaarizaga.com

S.E.X.

Look to this tote for the full truth


Vivienne Westwood organic cotton “Sex” shopper, $148 at farfetch.com

Don’t Give a . . .

If you really just don’t care what anyone else thinks, this is the necklace for you.


“Zero F - - ks” necklace, $45 at istillloveyounyc.com

Give ’em the Finger

Words aren’t even needed with this universal gesture.

Sterling silver “Middle Finger Emoji” single stud earring, $35 single, $70 pair, at wendybrandes.com

Article source: http://nypost.com/2014/07/28/7-politically-incorrect-fashion-statements/

Geek Couture on Display During the Her Universe Fashion Show

Her Universe Fasion Show Cosplay Winners Geek Couture on Display During the Her Universe Fashion Show

Besides all of the movie and TV news, the most popular thing to see at San Diego Comic Con each year is the fantastic cosplay – and it’s all of this cosplay that inspired rising stars in the fashion industry for their marvelous couture creations at the inaugural Her Universe Fashion Show.

The show – complete with a DJ – was co-sponsored by clothing company Hot Topic and pop culture giant Nerdist Industries as well as hosted by geek fashion maven Ashley Eckstein (who also voices Ahsoka Tano on the animated series Star Wars: Clone Wars). A contest was held before the show with 36 designers spending weeks fabricating some of the coolest dresses inspired by everything geeky – from sci-fi TV shows and movies, to comic books, to video games.

The concept of the show (which drew over a thousand people to its premier) was to bring geek fashion to a whole new level in the couture fashion industry – and in my opinion, it succeeded on many levels. The rules were simple – create a fashion-forward dress drawing inspiration from Star Wars, Star Trek, Marvel, DC Comics, and various other sci-fi/fantasy properties.

Ashley Eckstein wearing a My Neighbor Totoro dress designed by Catherine Elhoffer Geek Couture on Display During the Her Universe Fashion Show

Ashley Eckstein wearing a ‘My Neighbor Totoro’ dress designed by Catherine Elhoffer

Winners were decided two ways – Audience Choice and Judge’s Choice – with the each creation either worn by a model or the designer on the runaway in groups of 6. Meanwhile, the DJ pumped out geek-infused jams as a high-intensity light show was displayed. The judges were just as mixed as the designs themselves, hailing from a multitude of backgrounds: Chloe Dykstra (Heroes of Cosplay), Justine Ezarik, Hilly and Hannah Hindi (The Hillywood Show), Cindy Levitt (Senior Vice President Merchandising at Hot Topic), Lacey Prince (Fashion Product Development for Lucasfilm), Tara Sinclair (Senior Licensing Manager Disney Consumer Products), and custom jewelry designer Tarina Tarantino.

The 90-minute show was quite impressive and entertaining and adds a unique twist to the idea of cosplay in a direction that is good for nerds, geeks, and Comic Cons in general. As you can see in the gallery below, a lot of the fashion entries, while not necessarily practical, were highly interesting and uniquely inspired. The audience choice winner was REGINA’S CURSE (Once Upon A Time) submitted by Andrew MacLaine and the judge’s choice winner was GREAT SKIRT, MARTY! (Back to the Future) submitted by Amy Beth Christenson.

Other favorites were the WHOVIAN SCARF DRESS with TIN DOG PURSE (Doctor Who) by Tanya Nicole and THE HOBBIT WEDDING GOWN (The Hobbit) by Cressie Lewis.

Regina’s Curse designed by Andrew MacLaine

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Andrew MacLaine with his design submission Regina’s Curse

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Great Skirt Marty designed by Amy Beth Christenson Geek Couture on Display During the Her Universe Fashion Show

Great Skirt, Marty designed by Amy Beth Christenson

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Designer Amy Beth Christenson with her design submission Great Skirt Marty Geek Couture on Display During the Her Universe Fashion Show

Designer Amy Beth Christenson with her design submission Great Skirt, Marty!

Hopefully, the Her Universe Fashion Show will return next year to Comic-Con 2014 – so that we can what other blends of geek and fashion culture this community can come up with.

Stay tuned to the rest of our Comic-Con 2014 coverage.

________________________________________________

Follow me on Twitter – @MoviePaul – and tell me what geek-related show you would use for fashion inspiration.

TAGS: comic con 2014

Article source: http://screenrant.com/cosplay-inspired-fashion-comic-con/

Well-known artists ready for Fashion Week

Albert and Frances Paley. Wendell Castle and Nancy Jurs. Paul and Christine Knoblauch. Leonard and Myung Urso.

Imagine them all in one art show, coordinated by Grant Holcomb, who just retired as director of the Memorial Art Gallery, and his daughter, Maryn.

The idea came from Christine Knoblauch. She approached Rochester councilmember Elaine Spaull, who is deeply involved in Fashion Week of Rochester through her day job as director of the Center for Youth — the event’s beneficiary.

The show will be a highlight of Fashion Week, which runs Oct. 15 to 19.

On Thursday, Oct. 16, a runway show featuring local designers and boutiques will take place at the old Merkel Donohue site along Capron Street (near Geva Theatre Center) that is being converted into Woodbury Place. The art show opens the same night in that space, and 40 percent of sales will go to the Center for Youth, Spaull says.

Knoblauch and Spaull approached the artists with the idea, and received a very welcoming response, they say.

“It was humbling to see the caliber of brilliance in Rochester,” Knoblauch says.

The show is called Gallery of Fashion, where “art and Fashion Week will come together,” says Spaull. Artists will be at the opening on Oct. 16, and the gallery will be available for viewing for at least another week following Fashion Week.

Fittingly, the focus of the gallery show will be on families. In addition to the artist husbands and wives represented, the show will also feature artists and their children who have followed in their footsteps. While some of the artists have had shows with their own family members, rarely have these big-name art families shown their work together.

Christine Knoblauch and husband, Paul, are both metal artists with distinctive styles; Christine’s artwork has an organic tilt, while Paul favors contemporary styles. Christine Knoblauch’s father, Joseph Ventura, will be showing his stone carvings.

Albert Paley currently has a show in one of the nation’s most prestigious venues, the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, D.C. His wife, Frances, an art photographer, will be displaying fashion-themed pieces.

Wendell Castle, the world-famous maker of museum-quality furniture, has a family full of artists. His wife, Nancy Jurs, will showcase her sculptures.

“My sculptures portray messages on many levels, several expressing concern for safety in the world for women, animals, children,” says Jurs, adding that her donations to the community are always from the heart.

Jurs’ son, Bryon, also will be in the show.

Glass artist Elizabeth Lyons will be in the show with her parents, Nathan and Joan Lyons. Ceramic artists Stephen Merritt and Bill Stewart will show their works, as will their sons, photographer Jonathan Merritt and Greg Stewart, who creates art installations.

Albert Paley applauded the effort of the arts community to support the Center for Youth, which helps the area’s under-served young people.

“The arts — music, visual or performance — support an arena for personalization and enrichment of experience,” Paley says.

Holcomb’s daughter, Maryn, is a fashion stylist who returned to Rochester from San Francisco.

“What attracted me to this work is to be able to work with artists in this community,” Grant Holcomb says. He calls Rochester an incredibly culturally rich city, which locals sometimes take for granted. And that goes for fashion, too.

“Fashion is certainly an art form,” he says.

MCHAO@DemocratandChronicle.com

Twitter.com/MaryChaoStyle

Fashion Week of Rochester

Fashion Week of Rochester is Oct. 15 to 19. Besides the Thursday night runway show at Woodbury Place, which also features the art show opening, Fashion Week will include runway shows Wednesday at the Sibley Building (which will include dogs) and Friday at the downtown library’s Rundel Building (with a family theme).

For Saturday, organizers will transform the old Midtown Tunnel, the area where they dropped off deliveries for the now-demolished downtown mall, into an urban chic pop-up venue. Sunday will feature the annual boutique crawl, mainly in the South Wedge, Park Avenue, Brighton and Pittsford. Tickets will be available for sale at area Wegmans beginning in early September and they are $25 for general admission, $50 for seated admission and $100 for VIP seating for all four runway shows.

Article source: http://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/lifestyle/2014/07/27/known-artists-ready-fashion-week/13235961/

Minimalist Kids’ Fashion Is on the Rise



cat

ON HIM: Ketiketa Tulsi Shirt, $60, Sweet William, 718-218-6946; Wool Long Pants, $90, makieclothier.com; Champion Kids Sneakers, $35, keds.com. | ON HER: Leoca Paris Bianca Shirt, $116, Elegant Child, 718-336-1295; Riley Jeans, $88, Vince, 646-560-2897; Avarca Sandals, $75, riudavetsusa.com
F. Martin Ramin/The Wall Street Journal, Styling by Paula Knight, Hair Makeup by Mary Guthrie/ABTP, Models: Jace/Generation Models and Eve, Cups Teapot: Mud Australia, Table Stools: Svan

THREE-YEAR-OLD RIPLEY EHRLICH is already a fan of fluffy pink tulle tutus. Yet, she will never wear one to preschool, unless it is Halloween, as per a rule made by her mother, Los Angeles-based fashion designer Jenni Kayne.

“My daughter loves tutus, but those are for dress-up,” said Ms. Kayne, who keeps the colorful garments in her daughter’s play area. “I know people might think it is a little controlling, but I don’t put anything in my kids’ closet I wouldn’t want them to wear.”

It’s Quiet Time

Stylish Children’s Clothes That Don’t Scream and Shout



cat

F. Martin Ramin/The Wall Street Journal, Styling by Anne Cardenas (3)

GIRLS | Clockwise from top left: Linen Smock, starting at $66, makieclothier.com; Album di Famiglia Dress, $225, Estella, 877-755-3553; Ketiketa Layla Skirt, $70, Sweet William, 718-218-6946



cat

F. Martin Ramin/The Wall Street Journal, Styling by Anne Cardenas (3)

BOYS | Clockwise from right: Colorblock Crewneck Sweater, starting at $88, vince.com; Levi’s 505 Jean, starting at $36, macys.com; Levi Jacket, starting at $178, makieclothier.com

Ms. Kayne—who included a sparkle-free children’s floor in her new lifestyle store, Jenni Kayne Home in Montecito, Calif.—is hardly alone in rejecting the sizable part of the children’s market where oversize bows, sequins, sports logos and garish colors are the norm. And though it can be difficult to explain to your beloved cherub why he cannot have the light-up Skechers his classmates are wearing, American parents are increasingly taking a page from their European counterparts and outfitting their kids in more tasteful fare. Think pared-down cotton dresses for girls and engineer-stripe pants and logo-free T-shirts for boys.

“There’s a growing trend toward minimalism, toward something that’s a little more timeless, a little more quality,” said Adrienne Sugden, the designer and owner of Neige, a California-based company that designs children’s clothes that are classic with clean lines.

That wasn’t true a decade ago when Ms. Sugden, then an assistant designer at Vera Wang, began to entertain the idea of starting her own children’s line and noticed that the kids’ department was in need of a refresh. She saw the category as either overly decorated or far too traditional and conservative. Her wares have a sense of playfulness—”not scaled-down adult clothes,” in her words—and a refreshing sense of simplicity. Ms. Sugden’s label now sells in some 200 stores around the country.

Former fashion editor Bronagh Staley, founder of New York-based children’s shop Sweet William, thinks the American market has also changed because designers no longer fear the stigma of working in kids’ apparel. “It used to be that anyone with really good taste thought it wasn’t cool to jump into kids’,” said Ms. Staley. When she opened her shop in 2007, “we didn’t care about the ‘cool factor,’ ” she added.

It’s probably a chicken-and-egg situation to figure out which came first—the merchandise or the demand for it—but if the bandwidth devoted to kid-friendly organic recipes and

Suri Cruise’s

footwear is any indication, childhood has never been more fetishized than it is by the current generation of parents. More evidence: children’s lines launched by adult labels, such as J.Crew’s CrewCuts, and most recently, a baby and kids’ collection from Vince, a maker of edgy basics, which launched in June with scaled-down versions of slim-cut pants and cashmere sweaters.

Ms. Staley now has two outposts—the original in Brooklyn and another in downtown Manhattan—which stock a mix of American labels, such as Nico Nico and Anais I, as well as European ones. Stateside, parents can also shop on e-commerce sites, like Paris-based Smallable, which make those Danish onesies and French cashmere sweaters easier to nab.


‘It used to be that anyone with good taste thought it wasn’t cool to jump into kids.’

New York-based retailer Makie Yahagi opened her popular boutique, Makié, in downtown Manhattan 15 years ago, also sells sweetly subtle fare such as elegant Liberty print smocks and muted cashmere coats online. Meanwhile Bonpoint, the French gold standard for stylish adult-approved children’s clothes, has eight stores in the U.S.

Having options and access clearly isn’t a problem. What can be an issue is the Battle of the Light-Up Skechers, where parents face off with their young children in matters of taste. Personally, I had only to watch a single very soft and very expensive beige sweater collect dust on a hanger in my toddler daughter’s closet four years ago to learn my lesson. My fantasies of sending her and her twin brother off to school in tasteful gray-flannel jumpers have since been modified. I now buy pieces in stretchy cotton with elastic waistbands for my son, and I indulge my daughter’s love of mismatched prints. (I still draw the line at light-up shoes, and wince every time I hear my kids tell their friends that their “Mommy doesn’t believe in them,” as if the shoes were a religion).

Balance is key. Letting kids express themselves through clothes—even if that means tutus—teaches them to listen to their own voice and to learn what feels right, said Christia Spears Brown, a professor of developmental psychology at the University of Kentucky and author of “Parenting Beyond Pink and Blue: How to Raise Your Kids Free of Gender Stereotypes.” She added, “Parents have to pick battles because each one takes so much effort.” Ms. Sugden and Ms. Spears Brown, who both have tween daughters, draw the line at age-inappropriate styles such as navel-baring tops but allow the occasional bit of sparkle.

While it is easy to protest the idea of spending $66 for a 2-year-old’s smock, an argument can be made for buying your kids clothes that are both ethically produced and of sufficient quality to avoid becoming as disposable (and polluting) as diapers. Ms. Sugden made the case for handing pieces down. “The one thing about the market I service is that [my clientele] will have three children wear them through,” she said. “It’s how clothes used to be. You’d be careful about what you bought and take care of it. That mentality is a big driver of this market.”

Ms. Kayne advocates a mix of high and low. “I will buy jeans for my kids at Gap, because they make them so well,” she said. “But I will buy sweaters from Bonpoint always a size or two too large so they grow into them and can wear them for a few years.” She also thinks Spanish fast-fashioneer Zara has good options for children. “The trick is to be creative with how you spend your money,” Ms. Kayne added. “If you paid attention to how often you replace that kind of disposable clothing, you’d see that it really adds up.”

Explore More

Article source: http://online.wsj.com/articles/minimalist-kids-fashion-is-on-the-rise-1406307975

Marlo Miller Boutique: Fall Fashion

YOU KNOW, IT MAY FEEL LIKE THE DOG DAYS OF SUMMER OUTSIDE, BUT INSIDE WE’VE GOT FALL FASHION. YOU’VE GOT THINK ABOUT IT. HERE TO TELL US MORE ABOUT FALL FASHIONS. WE’VE GOT FASHION GUR WERE YOU MARLEAU MILLER, GOOD MORNING. GOOD MORNING. THANKS SO MUCH FOR BEING HERE. WE’RE GOING TO TALKING ABOUT FALL TRENDS. WE HAVE TO BRAG ABOUT YOU HERE JUST A LITTLE BIT. YOU’VE GOT A GREAT ACCOLADE RECENTLY, TELL US ABOUT IT. WE WERE VOTED HOUSTON’S BEST WOMEN’S BOUTIQUE. THAT IS SO FANTASTIC. YOU WERE NOMINATED BEFORE. WE WERE. FIVE TIMES. AND THIS YEAR WE WON! WHAT’S THAT FEEL LIKE FOR YOU? IT’S FABULOUS. I’M SO EXCITED THAT MY CUSTOMERS WERE THERE AND VOTED AND WE’RE JUST REALLY EXCITED. THAT’S SO GREAT. ALL RIGHT. LET’S TALK ABOUT THE FASHION TRENDS. I KNOW YOU KNOW, IT’S HOT — YOU KNOW, IT’S HOT OUTSIDE BUT WE HAVE TO GET SOME NEW THINGS TO KIND OF PREPARE. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE FRIENDS? RIGHT NOW A LOT OF WESTERN FLARE IS COMING INTO FALL LIKE WITH CHILE, WE HAVE THE IVY JANE AND THE SKIRTS AND BOOTS AND CHANEL PUTS A LOT OF WESTERN ON THE RUNWAY THIS YEAR. I LOVE IT, BECAUSE THESE ARE PIECES YOU CAN WEAR RIGHT NOW AND ALSO TRANSITION, RIGHT? FOR SURE. JUST ADD YOUR JACKETS AND YOUR LEGGINGS AND JUST CHANGE IT UP A LOT. I LOVE IT. AND LET’S TALK REAL QUICKLY BEFORE WE GET TO THE NEXT LOOK. YOU MENTIONED SOMETHING THAT’S SPOT ON BECAUSE YOU WERE SAYING CHANEL SHOWED THIS A LOT IN THEIR RUNWAY. AND OF COURSE, CHANEL, I MEAN, MAJOR TREND SETTER, RIGHT? I MEAN, BUT WE’VE GOT ALL THE FASHION WESTERN WARE RIGHT HERE. RIGHT — WESTERN WEAR RIGHT HERE. I ADD IT TO TOPS AND LEGGINGS AND WE JUST LIKE TO CHANGE IT UP. LET’S SWITCH OUT. WE’VE GOT A SECOND LOOK NOW COMING IN. AND THIS IS ALL ABOUT COLOR. I LOVE THAT. I’M A HUGE FAN OF COLOR, ESPECIALLY GREEN. GREEN IS VERY BIG FOR FALL. AND WITH THIS DRESS, WE’RE SHOWING IT, YOU KNOW, WITHOUT LEGGINGS BECAUSE IT’S 106 DEGREES OUTSIDE, BUT WITH THE FALL YOU’LL ADD YOUR LEGGINGS AND YOU CAN PUT TALL BOOTS OR GO WITH THE BOOT ITS, BECAUSE THEY’RE VERY POPULAR RIGHT NOW. AND ALL OF THIS OF COURSE YOU CAN TRANSITION TO OTHER THINGS. AND YOU GOT TO TALK ABOUT THE JEWELRY. YES, WE HAVE A LOT OF GREAT TURQUOISE JEWELRY FOR THE FALL. THAT’S VERY POPULAR, VERY LONG NECKLACES ARE VERY IN TO ADD BIG CHARMS, BIG CHUNKY PIECES. SO WE’RE GOING TO SEE A LOT OF TURQUOISE. GREAT STUFF. SO I KNOW A LOT OF PEOPLE ARE GETTING IN THEIRVATIONS RIGHT NOW AS WELL. — THEIR VACATIONS RIGHT NOW. WE DON’T WANT OUR STUFF ALL WRINKLY. THIS PIECE HERE IS A GREAT MAXIE YES. AND NO WRINKLE, WASH, HANG TO DRY. YOU CAN PUT IT OVER A BATHING SUIT. YOU WON’T SEE ANY WATER STAINS. THOSE COME IN SHIRTS AND SHORTS AND SKIRTS. IT’S A VERY BIG LINE THAT I CARRY IN MY STORE. IT’S GREAT. THE SHOES ARE SO CUTE AND I LOVE HER NECKLACE THAT SHE HAS ON AS WELL. YES. WE JUST ADDED THAT FOR A POP WHERE SHE CAN WEAR TO IT THE BEACH AND AT NIGHT THROW ON A PEARL NECKLACE AND SHE’S READY TO GO. ALL OF THESE TRENDS AT MARROW’S BU — MARLOW’S BOUTIQUE. WHEN WILL YOU BE THERE TODAY. WE OPEN AT 10:00 A.M. HE’S LEAVING HERE, GOING STRAIGHT TO WORK. YOU SEE THE ADDRESS IN HOUSTON. BASICALLY MEMORIAL CITY. OR HEAD OVER TO HER WEBSITE AS WELL. ALL GREAT TO SEE YOU. THANKS VERY MUCH. I’M A HUGE FAN. VERY ADDICTING. THANK YOU.

Article source: http://www.click2houston.com/news/marlo-miller-boutique-fall-fashion/27161368

4 Chic Ways to Make an Enviable Fashion Set

It’s time to embrace your inner Anna Wintour.

Getting in touch with your chic side is easy with the help of online fashion sets. You know those breezy style collages of mixed and matched outfits, the kind you find in glossy magazines? You can make them on your own with online fashion templates.

See also: 10 Fresh Apps for Fashion Enthusiasts

Polyvore, the shopping and style community, is one of these sites. It gives users a simple template for creating delectable fashion plates. It boasts more than 20 million monthly users, who have created nearly 100 million photo sets, according to Polyvore’s director of community, Nadia Hussain.

“Our goal is to democratize fashion,” Hussain tells Mashable. “We want to empower people to think about their sense of style.”

polyvore

This fashion set was created on style site Polyvore.

Image: Polyvore polyvore.com

Founded in 2007, Polyvore is a place where users can shop for name-brand items and stumble upon new items. There’s also a community aspect — users can follow each other and share creative fashion sets. Some users have gotten a huge following because of their sets, like Patricia Coelho, whose dark and romantic creations have received over 10 million views.

There’s no need to be a fashion buff to get started. Creating a lush photo set is possible for “anyone inspired by beautiful things,” Hussain says.

Here are four ways users can make their own Vogue-worthy fashion sets.

Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments.

Article source: http://mashable.com/2014/07/26/fashion-set-sites/

Despite a Crackdown, Iranian Fashion Keeps Pushing Boundaries

Iranian fashion
Tehran fashion houses are pushing boundaries in Tehran
ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images

In the latest case of Iranian authorities cracking down on fashion they deem “un-Islamic,” a famous clothing design institute called “Khaneh Mode” or Mode House was shut down last week in Tehran. The fashion designer had caused a controversy last month when it held a show with models wearing coats which appeared to be made of the Iranian flag—minus its religious symbols. Nor did it help that the show had allowed men among its audience, which violates conservative Islamic taboos.

Article source: http://time.com/3012471/iran-fashion-official-crackdown/

Is London Fashion Making a Much-Needed Shift Toward Commerce?

The city draws talent from all over the world: think of Mary Katrantzou, who hails from Greece; Ashish Gupta, from India; the duo behind Ostwald Helgason, who are from Iceland and Germany; Eudon Choi, of South Korea; and David Koma, who grew up in Georgia and Russia. There’s a reason they all elected to settle in the Big Smoke, and it’s not the weather. Central Saint Martins is one of the best fashion schools in the world, and attracts plenty of A+ talent. The British tradition of eccentricity energizes designers to try new, sometimes wacky, things. The British Fashion Council and Topshop both provide amazing opportunities for young labels — the BFC has partnered with Farfetch in the past, and Topshop has recruited Gupta, Katrantzou, and scores of others for collabs. But the focus has historically been either at the very high end, where it’s tough for those experimental types to actually break out commercially, or on the low end — in the form of ephemeral high-street collaborations that provide an injection of cash and notoriety but are a temporary fix. Some lucky young’uns have scored jobs with major luxury houses, like J.W. Anderson at Loewe and Koma at Mugler. But most aren’t so fortunate, and fashion is a tough business anywhere, even in the seemingly paradisal city.

Article source: http://nymag.com/thecut/2014/07/london-fashion-becoming-more-commercial.html